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The Crucible (Book and Movie)

The key similarity between the Crucible book and the Crucible movie is that they both follow the same storyline with some imponderable differences. For instance, both the book and the movie highlight the drastic change in the beliefs of John Proctor when he gets caught up in the lies of Abigail. It is worth noting that both the movie and the play indicate that John Proctor did not have anything to do with the witch trials of Salem at the start. Additionally, both the movie and the play follow a similar storyline and indicate that Proctor had a relationship with Abigail and believed he had nothing to do with her anymore (Miller & Blakesley 46). A similar storyline adopted by both the Crucible movie and the Crucible book facilitates effective understanding of the intended idea brought about by the book's author and the playwright. The utilization of a similar storyline also enables readers of the book version to understand the story better when watching the movie, where characters make the story seem more realistic.

The first difference between the Crucible movie version and the Crucible book version is that the movie has many outdoor scenes, while the book does not have any outdoor scenes. The four key scenes in the book version include the Proctor's, the Parris', the jail and the anteroom of the courtroom. On the other hand, the movie encompasses scenes, including Tituba's home, the Putnam's, a shoreline, the courtroom, the lake, the jail, and the Proctor's. It is vital to note that the movie utilized most outdoor scenes, as the movie director was simply exploring the advantages of movie-making to make it more realistic. The book version could not use outdoor scenes because it is limited to what can be accomplished on the stage in front of a live audience. The movie version also used more outdoor scenes to reiterate a symbolic message. For instance, the downpour in the movie version symbolizes the doom and dreary that is expected.

The second difference between the movie version and the book version of the Crucible is that the movie version entails more scenes, compared to the book version which has lesser scenes. Notably, the movie version brings in newer scenes with the aim of making the message presented to be understood effectively by viewers. For instance, the large group of stricken girls, which involved a large number in the movie version, compared to the play version, left the church meeting at the start of the movie to check on the condition of Betty. According to the movie version, Betty is more violent and tries to jump out of the window. This scene is not presented in the book version, hence indicative of the idea that the movie version has additional scenes. This additional scene in the movie version emphasizes the idea of "mass hysteria".

The last difference between the movie version and the book version of the Crucible emanates from their opening scenes. The opening scene of the book version is in Betty's bedroom, where Betty is in a comma state and is lying of her bed (Miller & Blakesley 1). The opening scene of the movie version is in the woods, where all girls are dancing. The scene was changed in the movie version to emphasize the reactions of Betty, while she was in the comma. Betty was trying to do this in order to avert being whipped by her father who had caught her dancing in the woods with her friends. The movie version presents a different opening scene to enable viewers of the movie to connect with the story in the book version effectively. The difference in the opening scene between the movie version and the book version is used to achieve the dramatic effect in the movie.