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Current Debate over Gun Control

Earlier this year, the multiplex cinema Aurora, Denver, turned into the shooting range by the masked gunman, who killed at least 12 people and injured 50. December, 14 was the usual school day for the most of the children and teachers in Sandy Hook Elementary School, Connecticut until Adam Lanza killed his own mother, breached into the building and wiped out the whole classroom of children along with the principal, 26 victims at once. This was too much bloodshed for one year. Let's take a closer look at the steps taken by the government to protect us from the further violent acts.

In 1978, the proposal was developed by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which stated that manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers would file the reports of sales, but not file names of the exact buyers to avoid the arguments. All of the involved parties, including the National Rifle Association (NRA), neglected the proposal and nothing was done (Davis 2013).

According to BBC, Democratic President Barack Obama unveiled the most powerful gun control acts for the last two decades. He was very concerned with the massacre in Sandy Hook and stated that these acts could not wait any longer. The main points are restarting the ban on "military-style" weapons, reducing the capacity of magazines, leading in stricter penalties for gun-traffickers, especially for the unlicensed buyers. In opposition, Wayne LaPierre, NRA CEO, proposed for the armed guards in the schools, emphasizing that Obama's acts would be the violation of the US democracy. According to him, "you ought to have what you need to protect yourself, not what some politician thinks is reasonable" (Wayne LaPierre, 2013).

Although this problem is widely discussed, many peculiarities are still argued. Despite the clarity of motives, the issue of gun control still remains unsolved. We should remain patient and carefully follow all the further information on this matter.